Pre-Clinical: Years 1 & 2

Preclinical Education consists of Years 1 and 2 of the educational program. During these two years, students will learn in the Patient Presentation Curriculum (PPC). Please see the New Preclinical Curriculum page for a full description.

First Year Courses

607 Foundations of Osteopathic Medicine (6.0 credit hours):
The course is designed to introduce basic topics in clinical sciences, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, pharmacology, microbiology, immunology, epidemiology, anatomy, and pathology.  Mastery of these topics will be needed to allow student success in the patient presentation courses to follow.

616 Skin/Musculoskeletal (7.5 credit hours):
The course is designed to provide the basic clinical science and biomedical science foundations needed for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries of the skin and musculoskeletal system, using the context of common patient presentations.

630 Cardiovascular/Respiratory (9 credit hours):
The course is designed to provide the basic clinical science and biomedical science foundations needed for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injury of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, using the context of common patient presentations.

641 Neuro/Endocrine (8 credit hours):
The course is designed to provide the basic clinical science and biomedical science foundations needed for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injury of the central nervous and endocrine systems, using the context of common patient presentations.

652 Renal/Gastrointestinal (8 credit hours):
The course is designed to provide the basic clinical science and biomedical science foundations needed for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injury of the renal and gastrointestinal systems, using the context of common patient presentations.

689 Reproductive/Blood & Lymph (8.25 credit hours):
The course is designed to provide the basic clinical science and biomedical science foundations needed for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injury of the reproductive system, using the context of common patient presentations.

696 Early Clinical Encounters (.25 credit hours):
Physician shadowing experiences at the Robert C. Byrd Clinic.

698 Clinical Skills I Lab (2.0 credit hours):
Students receive instruction in physical diagnosis and evaluation skills such as auscultation, use of diagnostic equipment and physician-patient communication in a laboratory setting as preparation for early clinical contact. These labs include experience with standardized patients and human patient simulators.

699 Osteopathic Principles and Practice I (1.75 credit hours):
This course provides an introduction to the principles of osteopathy, emphasizing diagnostic palpation methods and multiple corrective procedures for structural abnormalities. Integration of osteopathic principles and practice with organ systems is maintained throughout the course of instruction. This hands-on course provides the foundation for practice of osteopathic manipulative treatment.

Second Year Courses

Year 2 of the Patient Presentation Curriculum continues the presentation of basic clinical science and biomedical science foundations needed for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Second year presentations will become progressively more complex and incorporate previous presentations to form a spiral curriculum that reinforces and builds on previous learning. Students will continue to develop their clinical and osteopathic skills in lab courses.

711 Osteopathic Medicine I (10.5 credit hours):
Studies of the basic clinical and biomedical foundations of osteopathic medicine centered around patient presentations involving cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and reproductive medicine.

722 Osteopathic Medicine 2 (6.75 credit hours):
Studies of the basic clinical and biomedical foundations of osteopathic medicine centered around patient presentations involving renal and nervous system medicine.

725 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (1 credit hour):
In this human patient simulator- and classroom-based course, students enhance their skills in treating adult victims of cardiac arrest or other cardiopulmonary emergencies, while earning their American Heart Association ACLS for Healthcare Providers Course Completion Card.

731 Osteopathic Principles and Practice II Lab (1.75 credit hours)
Training in osteopathic principles and practice continues during the year. The osteopathic concepts of the integrity of the body, the interrelationships of structure and function and osteopathic manipulative treatment in health and /disease pervade the curriculum. One of the highlights of the second year is a student-driven, free clinic for osteopathic structural diagnosis and osteopathic manipulative treatment under the supervision of clinical faculty that provides the student with hands-on experience with actual patients.

743 Osteopathic Medicine 3 (6.5 credit hours):
Studies of the basic clinical and biomedical foundations of osteopathic medicine centered around patient presentations involving respiratory, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal medicine.

754 Osteopathic Medicine 4 (5.5 credit hours):
Studies of the basic clinical and biomedical foundations of osteopathic medicine centered around patient presentations involving psychiatry, blood and blood forming organs, immune system, and musculoskeletal problems.

765 Osteopathic Medicine 5 (7.5 credit hours):
Studies of the basic clinical and biomedical foundations of osteopathic medicine centered around patient presentations involving genitourinary medicine, chronic pain and substance abuse, and skin problems.

795 Clinical Skill II Lab (2 credit hours):
Clinical preparation is emphasized throughout the curriculum in the second year of instruction in the lab-based course. Clinical instruction and practice are provided via lab and clinical experiences in the Robert C. Byrd Clinic and other medical facilities in the region including clinics, private physician offices, nursing homes, physical therapy, ambulance services and other allied health services. Clinical experiences include labs with standardized patients and with human patient simulators. Additional training in ACLS, proctology, casting/splinting, suturing, death and dying, domestic violence, and other medical procedures are included.